COVID-19

Research
01 Jul 2021

  
This study aims to identify the pattern of creation of sectoral employment opportunities in the future as a result of the COVID-10 pandemic. 

Article
29 Jun 2021

Highlights

  • The socioeconomic crisis triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic has shown us that the social assistance system in Indonesia needs to be improved in order to respond to crises caused by a nonnatural disaster.
  • Lack of coordination and synchronization in the data collection and management of the information of social assistance beneficiaries and in the distribution of assistance are at the root of all problems that the central government still cannot solve holistically.
Publications
07 Jun 2021

This study aims to examine non-communicable diseases (NCDs) multimorbidity level and its relation to households’ socioeconomic characteristics, health service use, catastrophic health expenditures and productivity loss. This study used panel data of the Indonesian Family Life Survey conducted in 2007 (Wave 4) and 2014 (Wave 5). The original sampling frame was based on 13 out of 27 provinces in 1993, representing 83% of the Indonesian population. We included respondents aged 50 years and above in 2007, excluding those who did not participate in both Waves 4 and 5.

Publications
05 Jun 2021
  •  Almost 69 million Indonesian students face a significant risk of loss in learning during government-mandated school closures to prevent Covid-19 transmission. Some groups of students, mainly high achieving students from highly educated parents, are however better protected, implying that learning inequality is likely to widen under such conditions.
  • Only 40% of Indonesians have internet access (which is critical for home-based learning), and this will exacerbate learning inequality, especially outside of Java.
Publications
31 May 2021

The arrival of COVID-19 has created unprecedented challenges for the world. In Indonesia, the coronavirus has infected more than 1.3 million people since the first confirmed cases in March 2020. At least 35,000 people have died. Coronavirus curbs on the economy and society continue to have a shocking impact on human development. After years of progress, poverty is rising again. One in ten people in Indonesia today are living below the national poverty line. Child poverty may increase significantly.

Publications
31 May 2021

The arrival of COVID-19 has created unprecedented challenges for the world. In Indonesia, the coronavirus has infected more than a million people since the first confirmed cases in March 2020 and tens of thousands have died. Coronavirus curbs on the economy and society continue to have a shocking impact on human development. After years of progress, poverty is rising again. One in ten people in Indonesia today are living below the national poverty line. Child poverty may increase significantly.

Article
28 May 2021

Highlight: 

Differences in people’s compliance with health protocols during the COVID-19 pandemic are caused not only by their diverse understanding of its risks but also by their job demands, financial capabilities, and other socio-cultural factors.

Article
28 May 2021

Like a waking dream, people were caught off guard when the COVID-19 pandemic hit the world, putting their sources of income under strain. People lost their jobs and their income decreased significantly. A few of them had attempted to switch jobs, only to earn much less than usual.

Article
28 May 2021

Highlights:

  • Handing over the implementation of the PSBB policy to regional governments is inconsistent with the concept of decentralization, which essentially only delegates authorities, rather than separates authorities, between the central and regional governments.
  • Policy inconsistencies surround the implementation of the PSBB policy due to the varying interests between regional governments and between the central and regional governments.
Article
28 May 2021

COVID-19 pandemic has put healthcare systems of various countries, including Indonesia, to the test. Many problems that were previously unnoticed are now gaining attention. One of them is Indonesia’s lack of readiness to detect the SARS-CoV-2 virus—commonly known as COVID-19—in order to prevent its spread and speed up treatment for the infected individuals.

Share this page