Resources

SMERU aims to support researchers, students, policymakers, and practitioners with useful and helpful data and information for their work. The following resources are available to the public.

SMERU manages Indonesia's most comprehensive online database of national and regional non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Currently, there are almost 3,000 NGOs in our database, which provides information on each NGO's name, address, contact person, vision, mission, legal form, activities, and sector. It is an invaluable resource that facilitates other institutions to contact and communicate with various NGOs all over the country, as well as those conducting research on NGOs in Indonesia. Please contact our NGO Partnership Officer at hari@smeru.or.id if you would like your organization to be included in this database.

The Poverty and Livelihood Map of Indonesia 2010 details the poverty estimates and livelihood conditions of 33 provinces, 497 districts and cities, 6,654 subdistricts, and 76,125 villages in 2010/2011. This free and publically acccessible tool is invaluable for poverty reduction and social assistance programs, particularly for geographical targeting at the subdistrict or village level. It can also be used to determine the type of assistance needed in particular areas, or as a baseline for program evaluation.

SMERU manages an internal library, which contains almost 7,000 books and eBooks. These materials cover various subjects, including poverty, economy, development, education, and statistical data. Although it is not a public library, you can make an appointment with our librarian in advance to visit our library and make use of our collection.

The Poverty and Livelihood Map of Indonesia 2015 details the poverty estimates and livelihood conditions of 34 provinces, 497 districts and cities, 6,599 subdistricts, and 75,267 villages. This free and publically acccessible tool is invaluable for poverty reduction and social assistance programs, particularly for geographical targeting at the subdistrict or village level. It can also be used to determine the type of assistance needed in particular areas, or as a baseline for program evaluation.

in 2005 The SMERU Research Institute—with the support from Ford Foundation—developed the Poverty Map of Indonesia 2000, the first poverty map of Indonesia which estimated poverty rates down to the village level. The estimation combined the information obtained from household surveys—collected from National Socioeconomic Survey (SUSENAS)—with information collected through the population census (Sensus Penduduk) and village census/Potensi Desa (Podes).

 

Access to Poverty Map 2000: povertymap2000.smeru.or.id

The nutritional status map reports the prevalence of stunting, wasting, and underweight down to the village level. Map development was carried out using the Small Area Estimation (SAE) method with the Elbers, Lanjouw, and Lanjouw (ELL) approach. In 2019, SMERU developed a nutritional status map for the first time using the 2013 Basic Health Research (Riskesdas) database, 2010 Population Census, and 2011 Podes. Then in 2020, map updates were carried out in 12 regions using the 2018 Riskesdas-Susenas Integration Data, the 2010 Population Census, and the 2018 Podes.

    

In 2019, SMERU together with the Team for the Acceleration of Poverty Reduction (TNP2K) and the Health Research and Development Agency (Balitbangkes) produced a map of nutritional status (stunting, wasting, and underweight) down to the village level. The mapping was carried out in six regencies, namely, Rokan Hulu Regency, Central Lampung Regency, Pemalang Regency, Tasikmalaya Regency, Jember Regency, and South Central Timor Regency.

  

In 2020-2021, SMERU together with the Health Research and Development Agency (Balitbangkes) updated the nutritional status map (stunting, wasting, and underweight) down to the village level. The mapping was carried out in 12 regencies/cities namely Rokan Hulu Regency, West Pasaman Regency, Central Lampung Regency, Pemalang Regency, Tasikmalaya Regency, Pandeglang Regency, Garut Regency, Jember Regency, Kutai Kartanegara Regency, North Lombok Regency, West Lombok Regency, and Regency of South Central Timor.