Teacher Recruitment

Policy Research
Background 

This study is part of RISE Programme in Indonesia, a large scale, multi-country research program that seeks to understand how school systems in the developing world can overcome the learning crisis and deliver better learning for all. The study is one of the components in the Reform Area A that evaluates policies of pilot programs related to teachers and teaching, especially on improving student learning outcomes.

One of the challenges in improving learning is recruiting qualified teachers. Over the years, the government has continuously developed teacher recruitment process to ensure that the best candidates get the job. However, these practices vary by region and there is little research on their effectiveness.

Objective 

1. To understand the formal process of teacher recruitment and deployment and how well they are implemented on the ground;
2. To examine other factors, such as political, social, economic, and election cycle factors contributing to teacher recruitment and deployment process

Methodology 

We reviewed legal documents on the management of teacher recruitment and promotion and the legal foundations of Indonesia’s ministries and government agencies as relevant political institutions.

We also conducted multiple in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with members of House of Representatives at the national and local levels, technocrats from central government ministries, bureaucrats working with local governments, teacher union representatives, school supervisors, school principals, civil servant teachers, contract teachers, and parents.

 

Publications

  1. The Struggle to Recruit Good Teachers in Indonesia: Institutional and Social Dysfunctions
  2. Strategies to Improve Indonesia’s Teacher Recruitment Process
  3. Teacher Recruitment in Indonesia: Institutional and Social Dysfunctions
Coordinator 
Akhmadi
Team Member 
Shintia Revina
Aris Huang
Rizki Fillaili
Status 
Completed
Completion Year 
2020
Project Donor 
RISE Programme is supported through grants from the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID), the Australian Government’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT), and Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
Managing Partner 
Oxford Policy Management (OPM) and Blavatnik School of Government at the University of Oxford
Technical Partner 
Amsterdam Institute for Global Health and Development (AIGHD) and Mathematica Policy Research
Topic 
Area 

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