Stories of Beginning Teachers in Their First Years of Being Teachers

Policy Research
Background 

This study is part of RISE Programme in Indonesia, a large scale, multi-country research program that seeks to understand how school systems in the developing world can overcome the learning crisis and deliver better learning for all. The study is one of the components in the Reform Area A that evaluates policies of pilot programs related to teachers and teaching, especially on improving student learning outcomes.

Teachers are key actors in the provision of educational services. This study seeks to explore the real stories of young Indonesian teachers in their first years as a teacher: what drove them to become a teacher, what they had to do to get a job as a teacher, what their first experience in teaching was like, and what other experiences they have during their time of being a teacher.

In his study on the problems faced by young or beginning teachers, Veenman (1984) found that the transition from teacher training to first teaching job might have a dramatic and traumatic impression. Hitherto, there has never been a study in Indonesia that examines the development of teachers from their perspective. RISE aims at capturing the experience of young teachers from their perspective in the Stories of Beginning Teachers in Their First Years of Being Teachers.

Objective 

This study aims at answering the following questions:

1. Why do young Indonesians want to be a teacher?
2. How do beginning teachers undergo their first years of being a teacher?

Methodology 

We use a qualitative method using two instruments:  journal keeping and phone interview.

 

Publications

  1. Teachers’ Notes
Coordinator 
Ulfah Alifia
Team Member 
Rezanti Putri Pramana
Shintia Revina
Status 
Ongoing
Completion Year 
2022
Project Donor 
RISE Programme is supported through grants from the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID), the Australian Government’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT), and Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
Managing Partner 
Oxford Policy Management (OPM) and Blavatnik School of Government at the University of Oxford
Technical Partner 
Amsterdam Institute for Global Health and Development (AIGHD) and Mathematica Policy Research
Topic 

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